History of İznik

İznik ceramics date back to the 9th century; İznik, a town in the northwest of Turkey (historically called Nicaea) was the centre for this distinctive style of ceramics, with Kütahya in the west of the country, and Istanbul, producing smaller numbers. This style of ceramics became particularly in demand in the 15th and 16th century, and at height of the Ottoman empire, İznik pottery was often an official present from Ottoman leaders to foreign dignitaries, while İznik tiles were used to decorate palaces, mosques and other important structures. Later, these beautiful tiles were exported to other countries in Europe, and in cities such as Rome and Verona their distinctive style was replicated. The ceramics ate the Aga Khan Museum Shop are deigned exclusively for the Museum Shop taking inspiration from the rich collection of ceramics from our Bellerive Room and into the Permanent Collection Gallery. I’ve travelled to various cities in Turkey and worked with generational families specializing in this artistry to create special pieces for your home or to give as a gift to someone who appreciates bespoke pieces.